Department of Mathematics Syllabus

This syllabus is advisory only. For details on a particular instructor's syllabus (including books), consult the instructor's course page. For a list of what courses are being taught each quarter, refer to the Courses page.

MAT 22B: Differential Equations
Approved: 2000-09-01 (revised 2011-07-01, Bruno Nachtergaele)

Suggested Textbook: (actual textbook varies by instructor; check your instructor)
Elementary Differential Equations and Boundary Value Problems, 9th Edition, by Boyce/DiPrima (Wiley; $157.12 via Amazon.com)
Search by ISBN on Amazon: 978-0470383346

Suggested Schedule:

Lecture(s)

Sections

Comments/Topics

1 and 2

1.1-3

Introduction and terminology, direction fields, discussion and solution of some ODE

3

2.1

Linear equations; integrating factors

4

2.2

Separable equations

5

2.3-4

Modeling, mechanics; Linear versus non-linear equations

6

2.5

Autonomous equations; Population dynamics

7

2.7

Numerical approximation; Euler’s method

8

2.8

Existence and uniqueness theorem

9

2.9

First order difference equations

10

3.1

Homogeneous 2nd order equations with constant coefficients

11 and 12

3.2-3

Fundamental solutions, linear independence, Wronskian

13

3.4

Complex roots

14

3.5

Repeated roots; Reduction of order

15

3.6

Nonhomogeneous equations; Method of undetermined coefficients

16

3.7

Variation of parameters

17

3.8-9

Applications to oscillating systems

18

6.1

Laplace Transform, definition

19

6.2

Solution of initial value problems with Laplace Transform

20

7.1

Systems of linear ODE, introduction

21

7.2-3

Review of related linear algebra

22

7.4

Basic theory of first order linear systems

23

7.5

Homogeneous linear systems with constant coefficients

24

7.6

Complex eigenvalues

25

7.7

Fundamental matrices

26

7.8

Repeated eigenvalues

27

7.9

Nonhomogeneous linear systems

28


Applications and review

Additional Notes:

This syllabus is based on 27 50-minute lectures. This usually leaves two lectures for midterms, e.g. midterm one covering the material of Chapters 1 and 2, and midterm two covering the material of Chapters 3 and 6. Alternatively, one can hold one midterm and have a lecture on applications (and/or review) at the end.

There are several interesting options to extend and/or modify this material:

• One could spend additional time in the beginning on examples of different types of ODE, their solution and applications; then summarize the basic methods a bit more quickly.
• Include treatment of linear systems using the Laplace transform.
• Section 2.9 on first Order Difference Equations can be considered optional. Alternatively, it can be expanded with a discussion of iterated maps (e.g. the logistic map).
• Section 2.7 on Numerical Approximations: Euler’s Method could be the starting point for project(s) using Matlab or another software package.
• There are many computations in this course that can be further explored with a mathematical software package such as Matlab, Maple or Mathematica. In particular, Section 2.7 on Numerical Approximations: Eulerâs Method is the starting point for project(s) using Matlab or another software package.