Graduate Student Handbook for Mathematics and Applied Mathematics

This handbook contains useful information for current UC Davis Mathematics and Applied Mathematics graduate students. If you are an applicant and would like information about applying to our graduate programs, please go to our "How to Apply" webpage.

Table of Contents

  1. General Information About Your Graduate Program
  2. Who's Who in the Department: From Staff to Students to Faculty
  3. Administrative Information
  4. Finding Your Faculty Adviser
  5. Course Information
  6. Registration
  7. Financial Aid and Departmental Support
  8. Degree Forms
  9. Tracking Your Degree Progress
  10. Probation and Disqualification
  11. Departmental Exams
  12. Advancing to Candidacy
  13. Writing Your Thesis or Dissertation
  14. Filing Your Thesis or Dissertation
  15. Commencement
  16. Becoming a Teaching Assistant (TA)
  17. Becoming an Associate Instructor (AI)
  18. Miscellaneous Resources
  19. Campus Resources
  20. Learning and Professional Development Resources
  21. Health and Well-Being
  22. Housing
  23. Getting Around

General Information About Your Graduate Program

ALERT - Summer 2010 - We are in the process of updating this information. Mathematics Brochure

ALERT - Summer 2010 - We are in the process of updating this information. Applied Mathematics Brochure


Who's Who in the Department: From Staff to Students to Faculty

Throughout your career here in the Department, you will come into contact with a variety of individuals, from staff to students to faculty. For more information about the people you will encounter and what it is they do, please reference the following:

Unsure whom to contact? Please start with the Student Services Staff. Their office is located in the administrative office suite (MSB 1130) on the first floor. Or, you may email your questions to studentservices@math.ucdavis.edu.

The Galois Group is another resource to whom you can turn. Feel free to contact current Galois Group Officers or email us at galois@math.ucdavis.edu.


Administrative Information

Student Identification Card

Your student ID card identifies you as a UC Davis student to all faculty and staff at UC Davis and at other UC campuses. To obtain your student ID card, reference your Course Schedule and Registration Guide (CSRG) or visit the Registrar's Office in 12 Mrak Hall. All students must have a valid driver's license, or other form of valid photo ID, to have a student ID card produced.

If you lose your student ID card, you can arrange to have a new card made. To do this, please visit the Registrar's Office in 12 Mrak Hall. You must provide a government-issued ID (valid state driver's license, visa, or passport) and pay a fee of $15.00 toward replacing a lost, stolen or intentionally damaged UC Davis photo ID card.

Student Office and Building Access

At the beginning of each year, the Galois Group president assigns student office space for all new and returning graduate students. A listing showing your assigned room is typically sent via email, which also includes general instructions on when you may move into your space. Keys to your office can be obtained by visiting a staff person with the Student Services Office. If you are a returning student who has been granted new office space, it is very important that you return your old office key in exchange for the new one.

The Mathematical Sciences Building is open to the public during the weekdays from 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Overnight access to the building can be granted by using your student identification card, but only after your name and student identification number has been entered into the building's electronic key system. To have this done, please visit a staff person with the Business Office.

Copy Machines and Computer Labs

Copy machines are available for your use as long as the work is either teaching or research related. The machines are in several locations: MSB 1224, the Department's mailroom, on the first floor; MSB 2201 on the second floor; and MSB 3114 on the third floor. The copy machines will only work after a specific code has been entered on the keypad (see staff for the codes).

You have access to both of the Department's computer labs. The graduate lab is located on the third floor and consists of 8 Linux systems and 1 Mac system (this lab is not to be used by undergraduates). If a class is not in session, you may also use the undergraduate lab which is located on the second floor and consists of 32 monitors. Before you can begin using any one of our computer systems, you would need to create a computer account with the Department. To have this done, please visit a staff person with the Student Services Office or a systems administrator with the Technical Office, which is located on the third floor in MSB 3117.

Mailroom and Mailboxes

Personal mailboxes are located in the Department's mailroom (MSB 1224) on the first floor. You may access your mailbox in two ways: you may enter through the front door of the administrative office suite during regular business hours; or you may use your office key to enter from the mailroom's back door. Graduate student mailboxes are arranged in alphabetical order and are alongside personal mailboxes for the faculty and staff. Under no circumstances are undergraduates permitted in this room. Therefore, when you teach, never permit them to return work to your personal mailbox.

Office Supplies

Office supplies such as pens/pencils, dry erase markers, notepads, post-it notes, etc. are available in the mailroom and the second floor copy room.


Finding Your Faculty Adviser

Initial Faculty Adviser

Initial faculty advisers are assigned to newly admitted students. All members of the Department's Graduate Program Committee (GPC) and the Graduate Group in Applied Mathematics (GGAM), including the committee chairs, serve in this capacity. The incoming students are equally divided among the serving members and, to the degree possible, distributed in accordance with the student's area of interest.

Selecting a Thesis Adviser

Attending research seminars is an important beginning step toward finding a thesis adviser. For this reason, the Department gives unit credit for attending research seminars (MAT 290s), as well as reading groups (MAT 298s or MAT 290s). We have several research focus groups (RFG) that all students are encouraged to attend. RFG activities include helping to lead a reading group and organizing adjunct student seminars. For more information about our RFGs, also look under the Course Information section of this handbook or go to the Seminars/Colloquium web page.

You can find research information on departmental faculty and GGAM faculty, as well links to individual pages. And to view a list of the articles being produced by members of the Department, please check out out our preprints web page.

A list of advanced students sorted by their thesis adviser is provided on our website, which is helpful for the student who is not quite ready to approach faculty directly. The Department's student-run Galois Group has posted many helpful hints on many topics including how to select a thesis adviser.

Please note that only when you advance to candidacy (via the Candidacy form) and name your thesis committee members, including your chair, is the name of your thesis adviser officially recorded with the Graduate Studies Office. Until that point, when you first arrive here, you are assigned an initial adviser and that is only recorded in your Departmental file. Before advancing to candidacy, you may have a prospective faculty member in mind as a thesis adviser or find that a faculty member other than your initial adviser seems a better "fit" for you. If this faculty member agrees to serve as your unofficial adviser, keep the Student Services staff apprised so that any evaluation paperwork can be directed to him/her instead of your initial adviser.

If you have any questions or concerns about this process, please consult with a Student Services staff member or write to studentservices@math.ucdavis.edu.

Mentoring Guidelines

The campus Graduate Council's Mentoring Guidelines are available for further reference about the relationship between you and your thesis adviser.


Course Information

University Catalog

Although the Office of the Registrar provides an electronic copy, the official version of the UC Davis General Catalog is the printed one and is sold by the UC Davis Bookstore.

Schedule of Mathematics Courses

Information about our courses, including day, time, instructor and Course Registration Numbers (CRN), are noted on this web page. Additionally, you can obtain a glimpse of the entire academic year by going to the filter option box (in blue) and selecting "all courses for the academic year."

Posted Syllabi of Mathematics Courses

These are Departmentally-approved generic syllabi. They are made available on our website and should be viewed as an advisory tool. When taking a course, the instructor's syllabus is the official one for that particular course.

Seminars/Colloquium

You are encouraged to attend several of these; it's a beginning step to finding a thesis adviser. Closer to the start of the quarter, check our web page for details. Not all seminar Course Registration Numbers (CRN) will be noted on our webpage. The organizers decide whether or not to make the CRN public on our website. If, for example, an organizer knows a seminar will not be meeting regularly, it isn't appropriate to give unit credit. If an organizer intends a student to register, he/she will determine the unit allocation plan. In terms of how many units, some might give one unit for simply attending, and perhaps as much as three for special presentations. Organizers will be indicated on our website. If you have any questions about how seminars are organized, contact the organizers.

Registering for Individual Study with a Faculty Member

You may obtain research units when working with individual faculty members. These courses are MAT 298s (Group Study; letter grading), MAT 299s (Individual Study; S/U grading), and MAT 299Ds (Dissertation Research; S/U grading). When registering for these classes, you are required to submit a Variable Unit Course Request form, which is available in the Student Services Office. This form must be completed with the faculty member you intend to work with and filed with the Student Services Office. Quarter-specific Course Registration Numbers (CRN) can be obtained from a Student Services staff member.

If you have any questions or concerns about this process, please consult a Student Services staff member or write to studentservices@math.ucdavis.edu.


Registration

General Registration Information: What You Need to Know

Well before the start of each quarter, it is strongly recommended that you register for 12 units of "something" to maintain your full-time student status AND your eligibility to receive financial support. In doing so, please be mindful of the following:

After you have initially registered for your courses, it is then recommended that you make an appointment with your faculty adviser to review your course schedule and discuss your study plan.

It cannot be stressed enough that if you are receiving any type of support, you must register for 12 units in order to make sure your employment/support can be processed in a timely manner. Failure to do so could mean that you won't receive your fee remission which would result in your receiving a bill for the full amount. Apart from support issues, of course, ALL students are required to register for at least 12 units.

Graduate students are not assigned appointment times to register for classes and may enroll any time during all registration periods, which can be obtained via the Academic Calendar. If you are a new student to the program, you can find further registration guidelines by viewing the New Student Registration Instructions.

As mentioned above, you are also required to complete a quarterly study list with your faculty adviser at the start of each quarter. Your study list must include all courses registered for that quarter and be signed by you and your faculty adviser. Once complete and signed, your study list should be returned to the Student Services Office for processing.

Using SISWeb and Course Registration Numbers (CRN)

To use SISWeb, you will need your UC Davis Login ID (this is NOT your math department account) and password. Graduate students can establish their UC Davis Login ID and password by visiting IT Express in Shields Library, or online at http://computingaccounts.ucdavis.edu/. Please allow at least 48 hours prior to the day you wish to enroll to ensure your account is active.

For enhanced data security reasons, SISWeb also requires your personal access code (PAC) and student identification number to enroll in courses. Your initial PAC is your birth date in an 'mmddyy' format (e.g., March 4, 1985 = 030485). You must change this initial PAC to a six-digit number of your own choosing after accessing SISWeb for the first time. If you do not know your student identification number or if SISWEB is not identifying you as a student, please contact a staff adviser in the Student Services Office.

To register, you will need the CRN (Course Registration Number), which is available on our courses page or in the Class Schedule and Registration Guide. Any changes to the schedule are updated at the following site: http://registrar.ucdavis.edu/classes/clschng.htm. A number of graduate courses are listed TBA (to be announced) in terms of time and location. Usually, the instructor sends out an email indicating an organizational meeting during which day/time are agreed upon. Or, they might just organize via email.

For CRNs, you may also refer to our courses web page for additional details and options. For example, when known, this is where we will provide the title of a specific MAT 280 or special topics courses, and list which seminars (MAT 290s) are being offered and by whom. In fact, before referring to the Class Schedule and Registration Guide, it may be easier to refer to our courses web page first.

Is the Math class you want closed? Please contact a staff adviser in the Student Services Office.

Be mindful of the last day to add and the last day to drop courses. For these and other important deadlines, as well as fee information, finals schedule, academic calendar, the online catalog, etc., please visit the Registrar's website.

Troubleshooting

If you're having mechanical issues registering, send an email to a staff adviser in the Student Services Office to make sure you're properly recorded in the system. If you are correctly in the system, then you should be able to register. If you cannot register, we are unable to problem-solve anything further relative to computer access issues. You will then need to call the Registration Hotline, (530) 752-3639.


Financial Aid and Departmental Support

As long as you are in good academic standing, continue to make progress toward your degree, and perform satisfactorily in an appointed position (such as a Teaching Assistant) you will receive departmental or University financial support of some type. This support consists of a salary or stipend, plus full or partial fee remission. For nonresidents, several fellowships are available to help pay the nonresident tuition.

For more information about student support, please refer to our Graduate Financial Information webpage or contact the Department's business office at business@math.ucdavis.edu.


Degree Forms

For almost every process or stage of graduate study, there is a corresponding form that needs to be filed with your program and the Graduate Studies Office. Most forms can be found at http://gradstudies.ucdavis.edu/forms/. If you don't find a form, please consult a staff member with the Student Services Office.


Tracking Your Degree Progress

In consultation with your faculty adviser, you are to design a program of study that will help you progress toward a stated goal. Any changes to the program must have the approval of your adviser. Failure to have such approval may mean that credit toward the degree will not be received for courses taken, and normal progress will therefore be delayed.

Additionally, at the start of each quarter, you are required to complete a quarterly study list which you must review with your faculty adviser. The study list must include all courses registered for that quarter and be signed by you and your faculty adviser. Once complete and signed, your study list should be returned to the Student Services Office for processing.

During the spring quarter of each year, the Department performs a review of each student based on information provided by the student, the faculty adviser, instructors of the core courses, and the student's transcript. The main objective of this evaluation is to determine whether the student is making satisfactory progress and to communicate to the student expectations for future progress. The results of these evaluations are also used in the award process of financial support for the summer months and the following year.

Occasionally it happens that you might not do well in any given quarter. If this should happen, consult with a Student Services staff member, who will then direct you to the appropriate person, as needed.

Please consult your program brochure for more specific information and guidelines about progress toward the degrees in Mathematics or Applied Mathematics.


Probation and Disqualification

Graduate students are subject to probation if at any point their progress is judged unsatisfactory or if their cumulative grade point average is below 3.0, or if they accumulate more than 8 units of incomplete (I) or unsatisfactory (U) grades.

The Dean of Graduate Studies will inform the student he/she is on probation and what must be done to return to regular status. A student is subject to disqualification if he/she cannot meet the requirements to return to regular status. Students cannot be advanced to candidacy if they are on probation. Disqualification of students is at the discretion of the Dean of Graduate Studies.

For more information about academic probation or program disqualification, please reference the Graduate Studies Office's policy and guidelines on Disqualification and Appeal.


Departmental Exams

Master's Examination (Mathematics program only)

For the Mathematics MA, the candidate must pass the master's examination offered each year at the beginning of Fall and Spring quarters. Typically, this occurs before the start of instruction.

This is a written exam which comprises the material covered in 201ABC (analysis) and 250AB (algebra).

Preliminary Examinations

Preliminary examinations for the PhD degree in Mathematics and Applied Mathematics are offered each year at the beginning of Fall and Spring quarters. Typically, this occurs before the start of instruction.

For the Mathematics PhD degree, the preliminary exam is a written exam covering the material in MAT 201ABC and MAT 250AB. Students in the PhD program must pass the preliminary exam by the beginning of their 7th quarter of study (and advance to candidacy by the beginning of their 9th quarter). PhD students entering with an MA or MS or equivalent should pass the PhD preliminary exam by the beginning of their 4th quarter (and advance to candidacy by the beginning of their 7th quarter).

For the Applied Mathematics PhD degree, the preliminary exam is a written exam covering the material in MAT 119A and MAT 201ABC. Students in the PhD program or wishing to enter the PhD program must pass the preliminary exam by the Winter quarter of their second year (and advance to candidacy no later than by the end of the third year in the program). PhD students entering with an MA or MS or equivalent should pass the PhD preliminary exam by the beginning of their 4th quarter (and advance to candidacy by the beginning of their 7th quarter). Students in the MS (only) program are not required to take the preliminary exam.

Please consult your program brochure, as well as our original support letter to you, for additional information about the timing of exams.

 

Qualifying Examinations

The purpose of the qualifying examination is to determine whether you are capable of independent research. Once you pass this examination, you petition to advance to candidacy. For international students, once they advance to candidacy, the nonresident tuition will be waived for three calendar years.

Students in the Math PhD program must advance to candidacy by the beginning of their 9th quarter. PhD students entering with an MA or MS or equivalent should advance to candidacy by the beginning of their 7th quarter.

Students in the Applied PhD program must advance to candidacy no later than by the end of the third year in the program. PhD students entering with an MA or MS or equivalent should advance to candidacy by the beginning of their 7th quarter.

Please note that your thesis adviser should be seen as a valuable resource when preparing for your qualifying examination. In other words, he/she can help inform you of what to expect during the qualifying examination itself.

In consultation with your thesis adviser, you will select your committee members for the qualifying examination. For Mathematics majors, one member of your committee must be external to the Department. For Applied Mathematics majors, one member of your committee must be external to the Graduate Group in Applied Mathematics (GGAM). In accordance with the rules of Graduate Council, your thesis adviser can be a part of your committee, but he/she cannot serve as chair.

During the time you are selecting your committee members, you are also expected to complete an application for your qualifying examination, propose a date for your exam, and draft a syllabus which includes material you plan to cover in your examination. This process should be completed approximately six weeks prior to the date of your examination.

Once your syllabus has been approved (by the Graduate Program Committee, for Math; by the executive committee of GGAM, for Applied), your program Chair will recommend the appointment of your qualifying examination and committee to the Dean of Graduate Studies.

The Department also participates in quarterly workshops conducted by the student-run Galois Group. These sessions are informal and are intended to provide a generalized overview of the process:

 


Advancing to Candidacy

MA Degree in Mathematics

To be considered for the MA degree, you must complete a petition to Advance to Candidacy. All course requirements for the MA degree must be completed before submitting your petition to Advance to Candidacy.

Your petition to Advance to Candidacy must be approved by the Chair of the Graduate Program in Mathematics. Once his/her signature is secured, the petition is forwarded to the Office of Graduate Studies for final approval.

Please note that you may submit your petition to Advance to Candidacy for the MA degree prior to passing your written examination at the Masters level (or the PhD level if you are a PhD candidate). As soon as you have passed your examinations, please ask the Department to forward to the Office of Graduate Studies a Masters Report form. This form indicates to the Graduate Studies Office that you have met all the requirements for the MA degree and that you are ready to undergo the degree conferral review process.

MS Degree in Applied Mathematics

To be considered for the MS degree, you must complete a petition to Advance to Candidacy. It is recommended that you work with your thesis adviser to discuss whom to nominate for your thesis committee. Three members are required, all of whom should be consulted prior to submitting the Candidacy paperwork. Please be sure to have each member initial next to their name on the form as verification that they have agreed to serve on your committee.

All course requirements for the MS degree, except for the thesis, must be completed before submitting your petition to Advance to Candidacy.

 

Your petition to Advance to Candidacy must be approved by your thesis adviser and the Chair of the Graduate Group in Applied Mathematics. Once their signatures are secured, a copy of your petition is made for your Department file. Then, it is forwarded to the Graduate Studies Office for final approval.

Please note that you must pay the candidacy fee before submitting your petition to the Graduate Studies Office. The Cashiers Office indicates proof of payment by placing a stamp on your petition form.

PhD Degree in Mathematics and Applied Mathematics

Once you pass the qualifying examination, you must complete the petition to Advance to Candidacy. It is recommended that you work with your thesis adviser to discuss whom to nominate for your dissertation committee. Three members are required, all of whom should be consulted prior to submitting the Candidacy paperwork. Please be sure to have each member initial next to their name on the form as verification that they have agreed to serve on your committee. Your thesis adviser is the chair of your dissertation committee.

Your petition to Advance to Candidacy must be approved by your thesis adviser and the Chair of your graduate program. Once their signatures are secured, a copy of your petition is made for your Department file. Then, it is forwarded to the Office of Graduate Studies for final approval.

Please note that you must pay the doctoral candidacy fee before submitting your petition to the Graduate Studies Office. The Cashiers Office indicates proof of payment by placing a stamp on your petition form.


Writing Your Thesis or Dissertation

MS Thesis in Applied Mathematics

A master's thesis on a topic selected under the advice and guidance of your thesis adviser must be completed to earn the MS degree. Your thesis adviser also recommends a program of study in your area of application. You are expected to choose a thesis adviser during your first year. It is very important to choose a thesis adviser as early as possible for timely completion of the degree.

Using modern methods of applied mathematics, the master's thesis will normally consist of the solution of a problem or problems, from your area of specialization. The thesis will be read and approved by a committee of three faculty members, which includes the thesis adviser as chair of the committee. The thesis should be completed and submitted to the Graduate Studies Office no later than the end of Summer quarter of your second year. In support of your preparation, the student-run Galois Group has provided some tips to help get you started.

PhD Dissertation

The doctoral dissertation is the main part of your program of study. You are to select a topic under the advice and guidance of your thesis committee. A majority of students will be ready to begin some research activity during the first year of the PhD program. A good way to get started is to take a reading course with a faculty member during the Spring quarter of the first year and start research in the Summer after the first year.

Please consult your program brochure for more information and specific guidelines as they apply to the completion of your dissertation. In support of your preparation, the student-run Galois Group has provided some tips to help get you started.


Filing Your Thesis or Dissertation

Filing your thesis or dissertation with the Graduate Studies Office is the last requirement to be satisfied by candidates for advanced degrees. Deadlines and information for completing this requirement are listed for each quarter on the Graduate Studies Office website under Calendar and Deadlines and Information for Degree Candidates.

Please note that a candidate must be a regularly registered student or on Filing Fee status at the time of filing a thesis or dissertation, with the exception of the period between the end of the Spring quarter and the beginning of the Fall quarter, as long as you were either registered or on filing fee during that Spring quarter.


Commencement

The Graduate Studies Office, together with the Graduate Council and the Graduate Student Association, hosts graduate commencement. The ceremony is held the evening of the last Thursday of Spring quarter in the Pavillion of the Activities and Recreation Center (ARC). A reception is held immediately following the ceremony for the degree recipients, faculty, family, and friends.

If you receive your graduate degree in September, December, March, or June, you are eligible and welcome to participate in the commencement. If you are close to completion and will not be in Davis the following June, you are also eligible and welcome to participate. The Graduate Studies Office will typically send information about commencement in February.

Any student who will receive a degree in March, June or September, or who expects to receive a degree in December, and who has not already participated in a June commencement ceremony, is eligible and welcome to participate in a Fall commencement ceremony.

For more information about commencement, please reference the "help links" set up by the Graduate Studies Office on their Commencement Central website.


Becoming a Teaching Assistant (TA)

Teaching Assistant Orientation

The university requires that first-time TAs at UC Davis attend a TA Orientation, conducted by the Teaching Resources Center. This is typically held just prior to the start of the Fall quarter, and announcements of the exact date are distributed by the Student Services staff. You must register on line prior to the orientation at http://trc.ucdavis.edu/trc/tao/ to receive an email confirmation, which serves as your entry ticket. If a student has an unavoidable time conflict, a department staff member must request that their name be added to a waiting list for the other session.

Additionally, International TAs are required to take a SPEAK test once they arrive here. For more information, test dates, and how to register, please go to http://trc.ucdavis.edu/trc/ta/international.html.

MAT 390: Teaching Assistantship Training

First-time TAs at UC Davis are required by our Department to take MAT 390. It is only offered during the Fall quarter, therefore, if you're not TA-ing until a later quarter, you still need to plan on taking this course in the Fall. Although this course does not count towards degree requirements, it does count for work load units. If you feel you should not be required to take this course, you can try to appeal this requirement. In other words, some of you may already have extensive teaching experience and thus taking this course might not be the best use of your time. To do this, please contact our Business Office Staff at business@math.ucdavis.edu.

Teaching Assistant Evaluations

Questionnaires for quarterly student evaluations of teaching assistants in all mathematics discussion classes (without any exceptions) are to be distributed during the last week of classes. If you are not leading a discussion class, a written evaluation of your work is submitted by the instructor teaching the course for which you have been assigned to TA.

Please note that students enrolled in your discussion class must be given notice that evaluations will be distributed, one class meeting prior to distribution. Students will be given a minimum of 15 minutes to complete the evaluation form. Questionnaires for distribution to your students will be put in your mailbox by the Student Services staff, along with guidelines on the proper return of completed forms.


Becoming an Associate-Instructor (AI)

Eligibility to Become an Associate-Instructor

For those interested in obtaining a Summer teaching assignment, a call for Associate-Instructors (AI) is emailed sometime during the Spring quarter. Shortly after that (but also during the Spring quarter), a separate call for those interested in teaching during the academic year will go out. Only those who have advanced to candidacy AND who have met with the approval from the Committee on Courses can be considered for an upper division course.

In the summer, AIs are employed by the Summer Sessions Office. During the academic year, AIs are employed by the Department.

AIs are appointed by the Department's Vice-Chair of Graduate Matters after reviewing preferences, evaluations, teaching assistant experiences, and grade point average. Minimum qualifications for being employed as an AI include:

Associate-Instructor Orientation

All first-time instructors (graduate students and faculty alike) will be invited to attend an orientation session organized by the Department's Student Services staff. The purpose of this session is to better acquaint you with not only the Department's teaching policies, but also that of the University's. For more information on teaching classes including how to set up your course, grading, student enrollments, etc., please refer to the Instructor Handbook.

Teaching Mentor

For your first quarter of teaching, a faculty member will be assigned to you as a teaching mentor. The mentor will occasionally visit your class to observe your teaching and will give you feedback on his/her observations. He/she will also be available to critique your exams before they are reproduced and to answer any questions you may have on teaching. The mentor will provide a written evaluation at the end of your teaching assignment which will be included in your personnel file.

Instructor Evaluations

Questionnaires for quarterly student evaluations of instructors in all mathematics classes (without any exceptions) are to be distributed during the last week of classes. Students must be given notice that evaluations will be distributed, one class meeting prior to distribution. Students will be given a minimum of 15 minutes to complete the evaluation form. Questionnaires for distribution to your students will be put in your mailbox by the Student Services staff, along with guidelines on the proper return of completed forms.


Miscellaneous Resources

Galois Group

The Galois Group is an official organization of the graduate students of the UC Davis Department of Mathematics. All graduate students are automatically members of the Galois Group. This group serves as a voice for the graduate students to the Math faculty and staff. They also coordinate and facilitate various activities, such as Monthly Game Nights, the Departmental Tea, and New Student Welcomes. When referencing the Galois Group's website, take special note of their helpful tips and advice, which have been collected and compiled by the graduate students.

SIAM Club

The SIAM (Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics) Club at UC Davis is committed to promoting the interests of students interested in all forms of applied mathematics at UC Davis. They plan several events throughout the year including a student research conference. Students from mathematics, physics, computer science, atmospheric science, engineering, and other departments interested in applied mathematics are encouraged to join.

Explore Math

Explore Math brings together motivated graduate, undergraduate and high school students. Under the programs that make up Explore Math (Math Modeling, Math Circle, and ARML), graduate students in the Department design workshops that allow participating students to share in the process of mathematical research, discovery, and problem solving.

Dual Pair Program

The dual pair program informally pairs each incoming student with a "senior level" graduate student in the Department. The purpose of this program is to give "senior level" students an opportunity to welcome and share their experiences and knowledge with an incoming student who is just starting out and who may need that extra helping hand.

Math Cafe

Math Cafe is a mathematics-related club at UC Davis and was founded with the goal of encouraging students to succeed and continue their education in a mathematic field. By enlisting the help of graduate students from the Department, the organization has been able to find ways to let students tackle mathematics more comfortably and confidently outside of the classroom. The main focus is on females as they are an underrepresented minority in mathematics, but all people are welcome to visit.


General Campus Resources

Graduate Studies Office

The Graduate Studies Office handles all of the academic and administrative policies affecting graduate students. There is a lot of information available on their website, including necessary forms for exams and advancement to candidacy, financial support, and general information for graduate students.

Graduate Student Guide (produced by Graduate Studies)

The Graduate Student Guide is designed to provide graduate students with valuable information they will need in the next few years. It will also help connect students with the wide range of offices and professionals around the campus dedicated to supporting graduate students.

Services for International Students and Scholars (SISS)

The mission of Services for International Students and Scholars (SISS) is to help promote the internationalization of UC Davis by facilitating the integration of international students and scholars into the campus community. A major role for SISS is to assist international students and scholars with visa and immigration issues while they are at UC Davis. In addition to preparing the necessary documents to apply for a U.S. visa, SISS assists international students and scholars in maintaining their legal status while in the United States. SISS also provides orientation, assistance, information, and referral to international students, faculty, and researchers regarding financial, personal, cultural, and academic concerns.

Graduate Student Association (GSA)

The Graduate Student Association (GSA) represents graduate and professional students on the UC Davis campus. As the officially recognized student government, the GSA serves to empower students and build graduate student community through activities and advocacy. The GSA office is located at 253 South Silo. There are typically representatives from each graduate program, graduate group, etc., that meet throughout the year and discuss issues of importance to graduate and professional students.

University Catalog

Please note that the official version of the UC Davis General Catalog is the printed version prepared by the Office of the University Registrar and sold by the UC Davis Bookstore.


Learning and Professional Development Resources

Internship and Career Center (ICC)

The Internship and Career Center (ICC) provides career advising services to all UC Davis graduate students and postdoctoral scholars for careers in academia, the public and private sectors. In addition, the ICC provides a variety of workshops and symposia on topics such as CV writing, applying and interviewing for faculty positions, career opportunities beyond academia, and transferable skills among other topics relevant to advanced degree holders.

Student Academic Success Center (SASC)

The Student Academic Success Center (SASC) offers free academic assistance to all UC Davis students in: Study Skills, Mathematics/Statistics, Physics, Chemistry, Genetics, Biology, Spanish, Writing and English as a Second Language. They have several resources to help you. Located in Dutton Hall, their office is open Monday through Friday, 7:50 am to 4:50 pm, including the noon hour.

Professional Development Series (PDS)

The Professional Development Series (PDS) provides a variety of training opportunities on topics of professional Development interest to graduate students and postdoctoral scholars. PDS is offered by the Graduate Studies Office and is co-sponsored by other UC Davis units.

Professors for the Future (PFTF)

Professors for the Future (PFTF) is a year-long competitive fellowship program designed to recognize and develop the leadership skills of outstanding graduate students and postdoctoral scholars who have demonstrated their commitment to professionalism, integrity, and academic service. This unique program sponsored by the Graduate Studies Office focuses on the future challenges of graduate education, postdoctoral training, and the academy. PFTF is designed to prepare UC Davis doctoral students and postdoctoral scholars for an increasingly competitive marketplace and a rapidly changing university environment. PFTF Fellows receive a $3,000 stipend.

ReEntry Student Services

This office includes representatives from various student services units, including the Dean's Offices, Financial Aid, Advising Services, Shields Library, Child Care, and Family Services. Reentry Student Services, in cooperation with the Reentry/Transfer Resource Network and the reentry student club OWLS (Older Wiser Learners), sponsors special programs and activities for reentry students.

Student Disability Center (SDC)

The philosophy of the Student Disability Center (SDC) is to promote independence and integrated participation in campus life for students with disabilities. The SDC is staffed by professional Disability Specialists who specialize in different areas of disability: learning, vision, hearing, medical, psychological, and mobility. These professionals each work with an assigned caseload of students, determining their eligibility for academic accommodations and ensuring the provision of accommodations necessary to allow the students to participate meaningfully in educational opportunities on campus.

Teaching Resources Center

The Teaching Resources Center (TRC) has as its primary goal the improvement of instruction at UC Davis by enhancing teaching and learning opportunities for faculty and teaching assistants.

Women's Resources and Research Center

The Women's Resources and Research Center seeks to educate the campus community about women's issues and concerns. Its hope is to promote an understanding of the role and impact of gender in our lives and our society while helping women of diverse backgrounds achieve their intellectual, professional and personal goals and realize their full potential.

Student Judicial Affairs (SJA)

The Office of Student Judicial Affairs (SJA) serves the campus by enforcing student conduct standards and by upholding student rights and responding to student grievances. SJA works with students, faculty, administrators and staff to promote academic integrity, ethics, and student learning in a safe and civil campus environment.

Resources for International Students


Health and Well-Being

Student Health Insurance Plan (SHIP)

The University of California requires that all students have health insurance. To help you meet this requirement, UC Davis automatically enrolls all registered students in the Student Health Insurance Plan (SHIP). Fees for SHIP coverage are charged to your student account each school term along with your registration fees. If you have comparable health insurance and do not want to be enrolled in SHIP, you may apply for a SHIP waiver.

SHIP is designed specifically for UC Davis students with both Davis area and worldwide coverage. SHIP includes medical and dental benefits for undergraduate, graduate, and professional students. Beginning in Fall 2008, SHIP will also include vision benefits.

SHIP does not provide health insurance coverage for the dependents of UC Davis students. However, the student health center provides information and counseling for dependents regarding available health insurance options.

Cowell Student Health Center

The Cowell Student Health Center provides UC Davis students with wellness, illness, and injury care. Services are available to all registered students, regardless of insurance. Students pay small fees for most services.

Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS)

The mission of Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) is to enhance the mental health, interpersonal relationships, academic performance and career development of students attending UC Davis. CAPS services are also designed to assist all members of the campus community to develop a healthy campus learning environment. CAPS is committed to promoting inclusion, and the affirmation of diversity in its broadest sense. They strive to provide respectful treatment to people of every background who work, train and use CAPS services. Their staff contribute to the profession and embrace the richness brought by the intersections of gender, ethnicity, race, sexual/affectional orientation, age, physical and mental abilities, spirituality, socioeconomic status, physical attributes, as well as other personal and social characteristics that comprise individual identity.

Intramural Sports and Club Sports

At UC Davis, there's a spot on a team for anyone who wants to play! Every year more than 19,000 students play on over 2,500 intramural teams, in 60 different men's, women's, and co-ed activities. Polo, crew, rugby and Ultimate Frisbee teams accommodate unusual interests, while football, basketball and softball leagues let everyone take a turn at our most popular sports.

Activities and Recreation Center (ARC)

The Activities and Recreation Center (ARC) offers both informal as well as formal recreation opportunities. From working on your jump shot, practicing your dance steps, trying out the climbing wall, playing table tennis or racquetball with a friend to personal training, group exercise classes, and dietary analysis. The ARC makes it easy for you to keep fit, relax, have fun, and meet your fitness goals.

Campus Recreation's Outdoor Adventure

California offers some of the most spectacular natural areas in the world from Yosemite, to Mt. Lassen, to Point Reyes, to the American and Klamath Rivers. Outdoor Adventures can take you there. Offering a range of diverse hiking, whitewater, and kayaking opportunities, Outdoor Adventures also features a friendly student staff, a helpful resource center of books and maps, comprehensive first aid training, and a rental center stocked with top quality equipment at reasonable prices.

Child Care and Family Services


Student Housing

UC Davis Student Housing

UC Davis Student Housing operates three types of housing: residence halls, campus apartments, and cooperatives. Each area and its included buildings are unique in character, combining with the residents to create a diverse, exciting community. All Student Housing buildings are located on university property, and all are located on the main campus. As a graduate student, you may want to concentrate your initial search by checking out what is available through campus apartments or cooperatives.

Of course, if off-campus housing is more to your liking, there are many opportunities offered among the many community apartments surrounding the university.

Community Housing Listing (CHL)

The Community Housing Listing (CHL) is a service offered to UC Davis students and other Davis community members through the ASUCD Student Services Office. For a nominal fee, anyone can add a listing to the CHL database, and everyone can view their listings either online or at the ASUCD Student Services Office.

Galois Group Housing Information

If you start your housing search well in advance of your arrival on campus, you should be able to find a great place to live. To assist you, the Galois Group has set up this informative web page to explain the difference between leasing and renting. The site also breaks down cost details and shares tips on "what you should look for" when looking for a place to live. And don't forget to check out their Housing Exchange List.


Getting Around

Bicycling: Preparation and Knowledge

The Bicycle Program maintains and encourages the popular and beneficial use of the bicycle as an important mode of transportation to, from and on campus by providing the campus community with a safe, secure, and efficient cycling environment in response to customer needs and expectations.

Division of Transportation and Parking Services (TAPS)

The Division of Transportation and Parking Services (TAPS) facilitates the access and mobility needs of the campus community through the coordination of efforts among TAPS units and with other campus departments and non-university entities, and ensures that services are provided in a professional, efficient, and service-oriented manner.

Unitrans

Unitrans was founded in 1968 as the University Transport System, when the Associated Students of UC Davis purchased two vintage London double decker buses to operate on two routes. In 1972, Unitrans was opened to the general public, with partial funding from the City of Davis. Since that time the ASUCD/City of Davis partnership has continued, and now Unitrans provides public transportation service to the entire city with 49 buses on 14 routes, carrying over 3 million passengers/year (about 20,000 on a typical day).

Anyone can ride Unitrans for one dollar cash fare, and many types of prepaid discounted tickets and passes are available. More information on fares and passes is available by going online to their Bus Fares and Rates web page or by calling 752-2877.